PETA Global 2018 Issue 3

ISSUE 3 | SUMMER 2018

ADVANCING THE ANIMAL RIGHTS REVOLUTION

8 PAGE Edie’s Aha Moment “Why do we pet one and eat the other?”

13 ‘Crabcake’ Cookout Your family will flip over these tasty vegan recipes PAGE

18 PAGE Urgent Travel Alert! Help animals in peril

PETA Is Saving Horses, From Racetracks to Dinner Plates

Burger: © Sophia DeSantis • Main horse: © iStock.com/mauinow1 • Brown horse: © iStock.com/winhorse • Edie Falco: © Andrew Goldstein Photography Inc.

PETA’s work for horses goes way back. In 1984, PETA investigated a massive horse slaughter operation in Texas, which trucked in tens of thousands of animals from all over the country. They arrived in cramped double-decker cattle haulers that forced them to stand with their heads lowered – and were dumped onto fields in frigid conditions with no shelter and little to eat. When the horse-meat market collapsed, the remaining animals were left to die. Law enforcement refused to act – at least one sheriff was actually involved in the scheme. So PETA went on national TV and appealed to Congress, ultimately rescuing many horses and getting the shameful operation shut down. or Mexico to be killed. It’s a grueling, miserable days-long journey that PETA has ridden along on, from auction house to kill floor. Thanks in part to the awareness raised by PETA exposés, legislation has been introduced that would make it illegal to export and then butcher US horses cast off by the carriage, racing, and other industries. Thousands of Thoroughbreds are slaughtered every year – even champions like Ferdinand, the winner of the 1986 Kentucky Derby, whose life came to a horrifying end at a Japanese slaughterhouse investigated by PETA. Today, it is illegal to slaughter horses in the US, but no law prevents them from being shipped to Canada

Thousands more die during races, shattering bones after being forced to race when they’re nursing injuries masked by drugs. Horses die during Britain’s grueling Grand National steeplechase race and in Australia’s Melbourne Cup, and it’s estimated that 1,000 horses die on US racetracks every year, an average of three per day. “What if all professional sports had this fatality rate?” asks James Cromwell in a PETA video. “Imagine if three NFL players were killed every Sunday.” PETA is protecting horses by investigating abuse, resulting in fines, sweeping new doping regulations, and the introduction of federal legislation to reform medication use in racing. Its protests and negotiations prompted the first-ever industry-supported Thoroughbred retirement program, stricter whipping regulations, the release of medication records before major races, cameras

E Q U I N E E Q U A L I T Y E Q U I N E E Q U A L I T Y

in barns to catch illegal drug use, increased drug testing, and more. PETA has also rescued former race horses and changed public attitudes about racing.

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PETA is galloping to the rescue of horses around the world – see inside for more details.

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